Amazing Adaptations - On the Pacific Crest Trail

The final 200 miles of the desert hiking are finally over! They included a 25 mile stretch of the Mojave Desert through several large windfarms that was some of the hottest and most difficult we’ve experienced. In order to avoid the heat we woke up at 1 in the morning and started hiking across the desert floor in the dark. Along the trail we saw lots of little eyes glowing in the light of our headlamps and realized that there were bouncing kangaroo rats. You can learn more about out fellow night hikers and the interesting pupfish below! Next week we’ll be reporting from the mountains of the High Sierra!

There are so many challenges here and that is exciting - Notes from Burundi

Brian Menelet teaches law at the University of Ngozi (UNG) Our office spaces made us neighbors although he shared his 20 foot by 20 foot space with another law professor and I shared my space with the Spanish teacher. He was born in France, completed a Ph.D. in political science, taught a year in Tahiti, and found this three-year assignment in Burundi for minimum salary and free University housing. “I live simply and it is enough.”
 

The Student Association for Communicating Sustainable Peace and Development

We gather with Lambert to talk about the year’s efforts. Nine students are having a meeting to finalize the statutes so that they can be officially approved as a University of Ngozi (UNG) association. I ask about what they have done over the past twelve months. Elias, the Club’s President, insists that “this work is important. It’s what we learned in class with you last summer. Another says that “we have a hard period in the nation with wars and injustice. It’s been difficult for the young. We want peace and love for all. We want to prevent any violence like what we had in the past.”

Rice sifting the traditional way - Notes from Burundi

Graziella Hariyongabo is a very articulate, fourth year interpretation student whose command of English allows her to discuss the most complex issues in a fluid, even rapid fire manner. She hopes to become a journalist for the BBC or a writer. In her mind, “the violence in Burundi stemmed from misunderstandings between the ethnic groups. After independence in 1962, heroes on both sides were assassinated. Then there was genocide in 1972 and the revenge that followed in a series of civil wars.”

GSBI @ Rio+20: The Future We Want

Tomorrow GSBI Leadership Dr. Diana Wall and Dr. Kelly Ramirez will be heading down to the Rio +20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development. They will be meeting up with Dr. Luca Montanarella to participate in the GSBI organized side event- ‘Towards a Truly Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative’. This side event was organized by Dr. Heitor Coutinho and Dr. George Brown of Embrapa. The goals of GSBI at Rio+20 is to promote GSBI scientific activities, including a Global Soil Biodiversity Assessment, and help establish the role of GSBI alongside the Convention on Biological Diversity and other global environmental agreements.

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Climbers & Bats GCRT

This research team creates a working group of rock climbing interest groups, CSU biologists and human dimension specialists, and CSU students to strategically collect information on bat roost locations and share bat conservation information with the climbing community. View details of their GCRT here and their blog entry here.

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