You are here

Food Security

Pivots, Partners, and Research: Building a Successful Social Enterprise

MayanTerra just returned from 6 weeks of field work with rural farmers in Guatemala tackling food security and poverty reduction through improved farming practices, and this is a brief account highlighting our key lessons from the trip. Besides learning the importance of flexibility and determination in building a successful social enterprise, we also were able to apply several classroom lessons to the real world, including the role of pivoting our business model, pitching our venture to partners, and collecting valuable data.

Guilt vs. Empowerment: the Struggles of An American Consumer

Last week, National Geographic News published the article  “Americans Least Green—And Feel Least Guilt, Survey Suggests”, which addressed the different perceptions of “green guilt”.  As the title indicates, Americans have a larger environmental footprint, and don’t feel as guilty as other, greener cultures do.  However, the title doesn’t ca

The Business of Peace Corps Service: Why it Matters to Coffee Farmers in the Dominican Republic

This past weekend I attended the National Peace Corps Association Conference in Minneapolis, representing the College of Business.  As a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer myself (Dominican Republic, ‘05 – ‘07), this conference made me feel like I’d come home.  I spent the whole weekend talking with fellow RPCVs about their service and why our Global Social & Sustainable Enterprise

Mulching - May 23

Once the plants are in the ground and watered, the next step is weed prevention and evaporation reduction. Mulching offers an organic solution to both challenges. Colorado's Front Range is very dry with minnimal humidity, little rain, and high water loss due to evaporation; on a hot summer day the ground will dry up and crack.  By combining drip irrigation with a 3 - 4" layer of wood chip mulch we can cut water loss due to evaporation by as much as 50 percent! Along with reducing water loss, mulching helps minnimize weeds by covering the soil.

Planting- May 16

Before planting many letters were sent out to various heirloom and organic seed banks asking for donations. We received a wide variety of seeds from many generous contributors, THANK YOU! Seeds were then sowed in small pots and placed in our greenhouse to sprout. As the days became longer, nights warmer, and seedlings grew taller - we picked our date to transplant into the beds. We based our dates for transfer from the greenhouse to the garden on average last frost dates, which for Colorado's front range generally lands around Mother's Day.

DESIGN- Student Sustainable Garden

This project was created with an educational purpose to show students and people interested in gardening how to cultivate a wide variety of vegetables while maintaining beneficial relationships between plants. The Student Sustainable Garden (SSG) is located on CSU Campus and is a ten year old project managed and run by students. The garden is managed by Lea Pace and Robyn Goldenstein. This year the SSG partnered with the Student Sustainability Center (SSC) and SoGES to create a new system of planting based on Agro-Ecological Principles. The new plot was designed by Patricia Izquierdo and Josh Alley with guidance from the work of Gaspar Caballero.

Nitrogen and grain production in Malawi

Snapp et al. have an interesting article in today’s issue of PNAS: Snapp SS, Blackie MJ, Gilbert RA, Bezner-Kerr R, Kanyama-Phiri GY (2010) Biodiversity can support a greener revolution in Africa (107, 20840-20845). They find that diverse crop rotations that include legumes (either in rotation or inter-cropping) can enhance the net production benefits of fertilizer – increasing production and fertilizer use efficiency using technologies preferred by Malawian producers. (BTW, Africa is much bigger than Malawi).

Pages

User login

Featured Contributor

Climbers & Bats GCRT

This research team creates a working group of rock climbing interest groups, CSU biologists and human dimension specialists, and CSU students to strategically collect information on bat roost locations and share bat conservation information with the climbing community. View details of their GCRT here and their blog entry here.

Recent Comments

Join the Conversation