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The Student Association for Communicating Sustainable Peace and Development

We gather with Lambert to talk about the year’s efforts. Nine students are having a meeting to finalize the statutes so that they can be officially approved as a University of Ngozi (UNG) association. I ask about what they have done over the past twelve months. Elias, the Club’s President, insists that “this work is important. It’s what we learned in class with you last summer. Another says that “we have a hard period in the nation with wars and injustice. It’s been difficult for the young. We want peace and love for all. We want to prevent any violence like what we had in the past.”

Rice sifting the traditional way - Notes from Burundi

Graziella Hariyongabo is a very articulate, fourth year interpretation student whose command of English allows her to discuss the most complex issues in a fluid, even rapid fire manner. She hopes to become a journalist for the BBC or a writer. In her mind, “the violence in Burundi stemmed from misunderstandings between the ethnic groups. After independence in 1962, heroes on both sides were assassinated. Then there was genocide in 1972 and the revenge that followed in a series of civil wars.”

GSBI @ Rio+20: The Future We Want

Tomorrow GSBI Leadership Dr. Diana Wall and Dr. Kelly Ramirez will be heading down to the Rio +20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development. They will be meeting up with Dr. Luca Montanarella to participate in the GSBI organized side event- ‘Towards a Truly Global Soil Biodiversity Initiative’. This side event was organized by Dr. Heitor Coutinho and Dr. George Brown of Embrapa. The goals of GSBI at Rio+20 is to promote GSBI scientific activities, including a Global Soil Biodiversity Assessment, and help establish the role of GSBI alongside the Convention on Biological Diversity and other global environmental agreements.

Top 3 MBA Concepts at Work in the Bolivian Altiplano

Siembra Orgánica has now spent almost three full weeks in Bolivia and has been able to apply many of the concepts from class to the research in the field. Here are the top three:

 

I would do anything for food... but I won’t eat that.

The days are getting longer and hotter here in the desert of southern California . But we are now almost finished with this part of the trail! This week we made it to the 500 mile mark!
Recently we’ve noticed lots more desert horned lizards. They are so well camouflaged that you can’t see them until they move out of the way! One hiker picked one of them up and learned all about the lizard’s interesting way of defending itself. Learn more below! Hiking in the evenings is a good way to avoid the heat. It’s also a good time to spot coyotes. We have been lucky enough to see two of them this week! One more week in the desert to go. Wish us luck!

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Climbers & Bats GCRT

This research team creates a working group of rock climbing interest groups, CSU biologists and human dimension specialists, and CSU students to strategically collect information on bat roost locations and share bat conservation information with the climbing community. View details of their GCRT here and their blog entry here.

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